Why me?

Some of us have great systems that work very well on whatever we put into it.  Like a car, do you think that your system could break down due to chronic high stress, improper food choices, or diseases?  Even if you started with a brand new, high quality automobile and then didn’t perform any maintenance and used the wrong fuel, the end result will be costly monetarily and probably render the car unsafe for driving.  See how far you could even get with a cheap car!

It’s like hearing about three men being stranded in a boat on the ocean and only one survives.  Why is that? They all were exposed to the same conditions (temperature) and the same (lack of) supplies.  It is what they brought with them into the boat that made the difference: their body and its food processor, or metabolism.

Someone who exercises and does strength training will survive longer because their body has been trained and accustomed to using food a certain way, knowing that their muscles will use a lot of (x) during the routine activity.   Prolonged exercise is training the body’s metabolism, which is how the body converts food into energy.  These types of people bodies effectively use all the forms of energy: fat, carbohydrates, and proteins, because it knows what’s expected.  Given time, the body will recalibrate to it any “new normal,” but will initially still try to use the processing system that has been in place.   Carbohydrates are the first to be used from food or the body’s stores, followed by fat and then protein.

Survival or growth depends on what your body is accustomed to eating, how it metabolizes the energy, and its known pattern of output requirements.  If you are sedentary most of the day, the body gets used to no spikes in output, or activity. Since there is no projected use for the body’s energy, then the body just stores what you are putting into it.  The programs that advertise losing weight by starting each day immediately with exercise are reprogramming your body to activate its energy output at that time, quickly moving from zero to sixty to burn fuel.  When your body is unaccustomed to that “get up and go,” pedal to the metal acceleration, it immediately pulls from the most readily available stored food source: fat.  This is why many people see an immediate (2-week) result that eventually wanes when no other changes are made.  The body recognized the new pattern of “normal” and adjusted its fuel withdrawal source.

In this playbook, my aim is to make resetting your weight as straightforward and easy as possible.  Like a car, you may need to go to a mechanic first to determine maintenance issues (always check with your doctor!) and find your baseline “model” statistics before you start to fine tune the engine.  Since I have completed many “resets” from diets and lifestyle changes, I am able to provide sound advice and helpful hints gleaned from immediate experience of “in the trenches” and more importantly, the beauty of hindsight.  I’ll show you why the GAPS diet is successful for many (and where it isn’t for the majority of people), incorporating the best from the best food plans and “diets” so that you can make your own successful weight loss plan.

A Reset becomes authentic and long lasting only when you own it, making choices that work well for your body and mind.  Don’t like the smell of beef bone broth when it simmers? Make chicken broth or even fish broth! Tired of eating yogurt as your source of probiotics?  I’ll show you where to purchase kombucha teas or how to make your own kombucha or water kefir soda.

The power of choice is mentally empowering.  We will work with that advantage!

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